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Retail Retold Episode 219: Talking Shop with Whitney Livingston

DLC Logo overlayed on top of Tri-City Plaza in Vernon, CT

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Chris Ressa:
Welcome to Retail Retold everyone today, I’m joined by Whitney Livingston. Whitney is the president of Centennial. She’s been in the retail realist industry for twenty years. I am excited for her to be here. Welcome to the show Whitney.

Whitney Livingston:
Thanks, Chris. thanks for having me.

Chris Ressa:
Yeah, I love that chandelier in your background. That’s very Joanna Gains. We have one similar.

Whitney Livingston:
It is very Joanna Gaines, and I’m in Dallas, so you know, right in your wake.

Chris Ressa:
Yeah, for sure, So Whitney, tell everybody a little bit more about who you are. What you do.

Whitney Livingston:
Sure, so Whitney Livingston, as Chris mentioned, I’m the president of Centennial Real Estate, where, a national owner, operator, and developer of retail and mixed use projects, based here in Dallas, as you mentioned, I started almost twenty years ago in the San Francisco Bay area, working as a marketing ordinator for a male and have grown throughout the industry, moved to Dallas about thirteen years ago. with my husband. We now have three kids here and spend quite a bit of time on an American Airlines flight or in Lounge, traveling to our projects and U, and loving the real estate business.

Chris Ressa:
Amazing. Okay, I want to get us started with a section we call Clear the air. I have a couple questions for you about you. Are you ready?

Whitney Livingston:
I don’t know, but yes, I will be when you ask them

Chris Ressa:
Alright? Okay? question one, What is one skill you don’t possess, But what you did

Whitney Livingston:
One skill I don’t possess, but wish I did. Um, I do not love conflict. U. I am someone that just I do believe directness is kindness, but I’m not super comfortable and contentious situations which some might say, real estate is probably not the right business for me, but luckily I’m not in lasting. Um, so I would say, just being really comfortable in um, and contention Conversations would be a skill that that I’d like to possess. It’s when I work on on a daily basis, but but not when I’ve mastered

Chris Ressa:
Understood. We can talk about that off line for

Whitney Livingston:
Eah.

Chris Ressa:
sort that. I could go into tangents about that question too. What is one thing most people agree with, but you do not.

Whitney Livingston:
Oh, my gosh. this one is hard. One thing that most people many people agree with, but I do not. I don’t really believe in fate. I am someone that believes that you create your own path, and your decisions lead you in different directions, And I don’t know that. I think there’s an you know an end point for anyone, and you’ll just find your way there. I think you can control. You know your path based on the decisions that you make good or bad.

Chris Ressa:
I love that. So that being said, that kind of lead that was a good leading for me,

Whitney Livingston:
Okay,

Chris Ressa:
whether you know it or not, that’s a good leading for me in. I would say, in our industry, You started as a marketing coordinator at a property, and you have risen through the ranks that multiple companies in the industry to the roller in today, And it’s a big roller president. How many people are employes? Associates are at Centennio,

Whitney Livingston:
About three hundred and twenty five,

Chris Ressa:
So you know part of running a company of three hundred twenty five people. What are the decisions you made along the way? Not relying on fate that led you to where you are

Whitney Livingston:
Um, Well, the first one is, I am a huge believer in raising your hand. You know, there used to be a saying in our business, and frankly, to I C C Foundations credit, I think I would say this doesn’t necessarily exist anymore, But there used to be a saying That was you, You were either born into this business or you stumbled upon it, and I’m definitely in the latter category. I did not have

Chris Ressa:
Right?

Whitney Livingston:
a business degree. I did not have a finance degree. I had a marketing and psychology degree and liked shopping, liked going to malls, and decided one day to move to San Francisco, and got a job site unseen through Monster Dot Com. If you remember that website as a marketing ordinator at the mall, I’m pretty sure I thought it was great that I was going to get discounts at retailers and And so, but from there immediately getting into the business, loving it, loving the versatility of the business. Um, and from there, just raising my hand at every opportunity to try something different and just being really dedicated to doing it exceptionally well, regardless of whether I knew what all the acronyms were or what the process was. And so yeah, so I would say raising my head. I mean, I worked, N pretty much worked in every department in our business, with the exception of leasing back to my lack of negotiation skills. Um, so our comfort and negotiation. so, um, so I think, raising my hand, and then the other thing I would say is just also not being afraid of being vulnerable and not knowing things and asking questions. Um, this has traditionally been an industry where Um, you know you Again Because of it’s a generational business. Um, you know, it wasn’t always cool or okay to not know the answer and I was very lucky to have mentors and managers that were really willing to invest the time in me. that when I had questions and was willing to ask them, they took the time to teach me, and that made a huge difference. And frankly, as also the type of manager that I am now, As a result,

Chris Ressa:
That’s great. Did. Is there? Well, I’m gonna save that question. So you come from the marketing background. What was it about this industry that said, I want to be deeper in that industry Versus what might call it. Just the marketing industry.

Whitney Livingston:
Sure, um, honestly, it was the people. I just immediately, Um, met so many great people in San Francisco that were in this industry through, you know, local, I see events and Next Gen events. This was in the early two thousands, and just started creating relationships, And you know, Chris, I mean, this is obviously a relationship driven business, and so working with great people, Um, and also frankly not being pigeon holed, Justin marketing, being able to see, see the field if you will, and be involved in other development and asset management and project management, and much to my marketing department, Sugar in today, I still like to consider myself a recovering marketing manager because I love the creative side of the business, but for sure, the fact that you had so much accent To other parts of the business was really interesting to me.

Chris Ressa:
Got it Along the way. Were there any pivotal points where you are Like All right. This was like a career defining moment for me. That that has that really propelled you

Whitney Livingston:
Um, there’s probably two. one. I invested my first significant bonus in an executive coach and I was in my late twenties, and trying to figure out what my path was, I had found myself in a place of being a generalist. I had a couple of years of marketing, a couple o years, an asset management, a couple of years in project management and development, and was really trying to figure out, you know if I was what, As a specialist in if you will, And so that was an incredible experience. I’ve actually never stopped having a coach. I’ve had different ones since then based on different points of my career, but having someone to really help me focus on me and what I needed to do better or what I needed to learn, Um U was was one of the best decisions that I made again in my in my midtolate twenties, and then I’d say the second piece.

Chris Ressa:
So

Whitney Livingston:
Oh yeah. fine.

Chris Ressa:
so can you give? I’m going to give. I don’t mean to get two personal. Can you give like to someone who’s listening in their mid to age twenties? How much dollars that was that you took out of your own pocket, and like put into your career? How much did you spend on an executive coach

Whitney Livingston:
Yeah, it was probably.

Chris Ressa:
at that time?

Whitney Livingston:
Um. it was probably wenty grand, twenty twenty five grand

Chris Ressa:
So

Whitney Livingston:
for

Chris Ressa:
that,

Whitney Livingston:
the year.

Chris Ressa:
and probably at that time pretty sizable percentage of your total income.

Whitney Livingston:
Yes,

Chris Ressa:
Twenty grand. So I think that’s like, Probably striking to a lot of the people in listening right now. that because I think there’s this thought like, and I’m not saying company shouldn’t, but there

Whitney Livingston:
Sure,

Chris Ressa:
might be a thought that the company should pay for that, but you were just like. I’m gon invest in myself. This is where I want to go. This seems like a lot of money, but I’m going dive in and I’m going to. I’m going to do this.

Whitney Livingston:
Yeah, well, also the benefit to me paying for it I was. I was, not only you know, physically in invested in it, I was personally mentally invested in it, you know,

Chris Ressa:
Yeah,

Whitney Livingston:
emotionally invested in it. and I also wanted it to be for me. Like if the company was paying for it, it was. How am I a better employee? Or what can I do better for the company? I wanted it to be about. You know about Whitney, And we spent a lot of time on. You know, not only just what did I need to learn to be a better professional down the road, whether it was taking finance classes that I didn’t take in college or Um, but it was also personal branding. And what do I need to be doing to build a brand in the industry that’s authentic to who I am?

Chris Ressa:
Yeah,

Whitney Livingston:
Um, and that will ultimately help me get know, Navigate through my career to you know, wherever I wanted to be in at the time, I didn’t even know Where that was. Um, so, um, so yeah, I mean, it’s been a process, and like I said I’ve I’ve never not had one since then and still paying for it

Chris Ressa:
And well, I imagine their price here today for the ones you’re doing

Whitney Livingston:
A

Chris Ressa:
an

Whitney Livingston:
little bit.

Chris Ressa:
inflation. So yes, So what was career defining moment number two?

Whitney Livingston:
Um.

Chris Ressa:
You said

Whitney Livingston:
So

Chris Ressa:
two.

Whitney Livingston:
I was at Madison Market for about thirteen years, Um, and about seven years into my time there. the company was going from being a regionally organized company to a national platform, so for the first six years that I was there, every region had a president, every region had a head of Lisaing, had a marketing et cetera et cetera, And so when they were moving to a national structure and there were Four regions, there was going to be one president and one head of Lacing and one head of marketing, And so the president came to me and offered me a job to be the head of property management, And the irony was I had never managed a property, Um, and I remember, and I knew him well. I had worked for him in the regional office. He had been a great mentor to me. Um, and he just said, What You’re a problem solver. You’ll figure it out. You don’t need to know How to calculate a Cam recovery, or you know what the s o P is today, But you need to organize teams and you need to understand the risk management of the business and the experience we want to deliver our properties, And then you need to motivate the property teams and the original teams to execute. And so I think for me it was a time where I never would have had the confidence in myself. just strictly based on the words on the paper. I was. I didn’t know property management. Um, So how could I run a national organization of twenty million square feet of you know property management professionals, Um, So I think he gave me the confidence that I, you know needed, Um, and it was something that in going into any new situation now, Um, you know there’s there’s not going to be anyone going into the room. That’s that’s more confident in what I can do than myself.

Chris Ressa:
All right, love that. So I love that story because it connects a little bit, my head of property management, or senior vice president property management. He was a director of asset management For a few years.

Whitney Livingston:
Hm.

Chris Ressa:
We moved him into this. He had never managed property before.

Whitney Livingston:
Yeah,

Chris Ressa:
He’s doing great. and Um, you know, I would. a lot of the same thoughts you had was in his coming from Ascent management. A little, You know, he had some of a lot of the financial background,

Whitney Livingston:
Sure,

Chris Ressa:
but you know not a lot about on the facilities portion

Whitney Livingston:
Yeah,

Chris Ressa:
for sure, And of our property managers in our industry are definitely facilities experts.

Whitney Livingston:
Sure,

Chris Ressa:
Um, right, So learned a lot. Now he’s you know, I would call him a facilities expert. Even though he hasn’t done

Whitney Livingston:
Sir,

Chris Ressa:
any, He’s got his arms around. what’s going on? So you took on this role in this new section of the business and you were leading people, and there’s a lot like you know. You got to command respect. I’m sure there’s people out there like. Oh my God, I’ve been doing this for twenty five years.

Whitney Livingston:
Hm,

Chris Ressa:
This person’s never done. It. Talked me through how you got through that because I wasn’t there Masimarket, but I know there was some people there who were like, Wait a second. I’ve been running properties for

Whitney Livingston:
Yeah,

Chris Ressa:
twenty years. What is this person to help me with?

Whitney Livingston:
Yeah, well, you know, Add to that I didn’t have any property management experience. I think I might have been thirty, Um, and I was female and a male dominated sector of our industry and property management. right, So Um,

Chris Ressa:
Not easy.

Whitney Livingston:
it was not easy. It had to get worse before it got better because I had to earn respect, and frankly, I think that was probably another really Hilital. Part of my career was learning that being respected was more important than being liked, And you know we all kind of grow up. grow up thinking you know being liked is really important. Um, and I do still think being liked is important for the right reasons, but in business it was more important that I was respected by these people that were gonna be on my team or the people that were on the team of the people that were going to report to me, And so, um, so you know, We’re definitely some difficult conversations. Um. but first and foremost I was present and accessible and I would walk the properties and I would ask questions and I would acknowledge that I didn’t know all the answers, but I was going to be a part of the solution with them and it resonated for some people and for the people that that didn’t they? They moved on, and you know candidly we built an incredible team That now I call my friends, and some frankly, that were probably the biggest nay sayers at the time. And so it was a. It was a really interesting process to be a part of M. but it was not without its. Uh, it’s difficult moments and I think just building trust and respect was you know, Most important.

Chris Ressa:
So trust respect. I heard there some vulnerability Because you were like.

Whitney Livingston:
Yeah,

Chris Ressa:
I don’t know this and presence

Whitney Livingston:
Yes,

Chris Ressa:
in being accessible.

Whitney Livingston:
yeah, absolutely

Chris Ressa:
And so you move on from that and then you end up at Centennial, So tell me about that process and now where you are at

Whitney Livingston:
Sure,

Chris Ressa:
Sintennial, and what your world looks like today.

Whitney Livingston:
yeah, absolutely so Santonio as a twenty five year old firm started by our founder Stephen Levin, who’s our co. And and so Stephen and I started talking, probably about nine months before I actually joined, And he was creating a new role as the coo. He had never had one. He was focused on growth. We were a small firm. At the time, We were nine million square feet, think eighty employees, and this was in late twenty, twenty eight, Um, And we had always been an owner of our real estate, And so we were not in the third party side of the business. Um, And and so we spent a lot of time getting to know each other, and M, and ultimately I took the leap and joined him here in Dallas, And as I mentioned, you spend a lot of time on airline flights today, but I was commuting back and forth to San Francisco in D, C. when I was living in. It’s working for Madison Market, so being able to have some roots

Chris Ressa:
Wow,

Whitney Livingston:
in the in the city where I lived, and as a mom of three small kids at the time, Um, three bigger kids. Now, Um that you know that was important to me, M. And so Um, we were focused on two things, executing on what we had, M, which was a growing development business that we had never planned on. We, like many mall owners, had bought Proud X and strong markets with great cash flow, and our plan was just to improve the merchandising and increase the cash flow. And we started seeing the demise of the department store, the rise of Com you small shop tenant Hclosings, and very quickly realize we had to pivot our business, and all of a sudden found ourselves in the development business, and so we had to execute on what we had, and we had to figure out how to parlay that strong exec In into growth, And so you know, sprinkle a pandemic in the middle of that M. We did ultimately move into the third party business in twenty twenty, Um, and then most recently acquired a platform operating platform formerly called Bare properties, which was primarily developer operator, owner of lifestyle projects Air projects, which became really important for us relative to our development projects, which would all include an open air component, And so we have spent the last I guess seven months integrating those two firms and still have ways to go. But it’s been. It’s been a really exciting almost five years at Centennial, and looking forward to many many more.

Chris Ressa:
So a million questions, but I’m going to try to

Whitney Livingston:
Sure.

Chris Ressa:
come them down. So one you’ve mentioned a couple of times you’re on a plane all the time, and so I travel a lot. I think it’s interesting. What are you doing in your travels? Why are you on a plane all the time?

Whitney Livingston:
Ah, well, I’m a real estate chunky. I love seeing the projects.

Chris Ressa:
So when you’re going and you’re going to the property, what are you doing And why is it important for you to do it?

Whitney Livingston:
Uh, blots of things, looking at new new acquisitions I was in,

Chris Ressa:
Okay?

Whitney Livingston:
Was looking at a project yesterday. In a new market. I came home like keeking out. My husband was like You look like you’ve had a great day and I left in the morning. I spent the whole day in market. It was a market I wasn’t really familiar with, so I got to learn a bunch of new stuff. Saw the project. All the competing centers drafted a memo on the flight home about the property And you know it’s It’s all about the real estate, So that was really fun. So Seeing new acquisitions meeting with clients, meeting with capital partners, seeing our existing projects and spending time with our teams, which is a big part of something I’m really passionate about is. Um, you know, staying connected to the people that frankly do all the hard work every day, and you know, going back to those two key priorities of executing on what we have and parleying that into growth without those people, we can’t do either, So, um, so it’s a mix of things going to conferences and board meetings. Um, so yeah,

Chris Ressa:
Okay, something else? you touchdown, Mom of this is a generic question,

Whitney Livingston:
Sorry,

Chris Ressa:
but I’m so curious, Mom of three, president of a company of three undo twenty five people, corporate executive, How to get the work life balance Continue in there.

Whitney Livingston:
Um, someone recently in our company said something like, while Whitney response to emails like twenty four seven and an executive responded to that individual and said Wine is not the model employee. Uh, and

Chris Ressa:
Hm,

Whitney Livingston:
I’m probably not like work like balance, and something that I definitely um, work on every day. I mean, I will tell you we. you know it takes a village, Were really lucky that we have a lot of help here and Alice with family and friends and car pools, and Um, and so it works for us. But but work life balance is something that I think is really important. I think it’s going to become even more important as our industry continues to diversify, Um. and I think it’s something that in deck, executives myself included, have to have to Um, be better examples up. so it’s on the twenty twenty three goals.

Chris Ressa:
Hm, Yeah, the support. One thing I always tell people is So I’m a little bit in the same vein from working being on all the time, but have a very good support system outside of work

Whitney Livingston:
Hm,

Chris Ressa:
between family and my wife, Um, in laws and a whole bunch of others that help keep the wheels moving.

Whitney Livingston:
Yeah,

Chris Ressa:
Without that it will be, you know my life would be different. It would be a challenge.

Whitney Livingston:
Yeah,

Chris Ressa:
So so Okay, thank you for sharing

Whitney Livingston:
Yeah,

Chris Ressa:
your story and all that about you and what’s going on its intennial. Really interesting. Uh, what’s your take? What’s going on in the industry right now? In your in your eyes, what’s your take? What’s going on?

Whitney Livingston:
It’s

Chris Ressa:
What are

Whitney Livingston:
it’s

Chris Ressa:
you seeing

Whitney Livingston:
really

Chris Ressa:
out there?

Whitney Livingston:
easy. Um, you know, easy to buy

Chris Ressa:
I love

Whitney Livingston:
projects

Chris Ressa:
that,

Whitney Livingston:
financing super simple low rates,

Chris Ressa:
Kay.

Whitney Livingston:
um, um, ah, no, I wish. M. look, it’s

Chris Ressa:
Oh yeah,

Whitney Livingston:
you know, I’m gonna move away from like the macro economic side of the business, and I would just tell you, I think it’s one of the most exciting times and in my career in Retail real estate, So in for me, Um, we are in a you know a silver lining. I hate to say it, but if we have to find one of what we went through in twenty twenty and twenty twenty one as an industry, I think we are finally in a place as a business that is willing to look at things differently and we don’t have to just do things the way that they had been done previously. We don’t have to just build malls with a ring road and four anchors and way too much G. l in the middle. Because and stamp that across the, you know the country, you know. I think we’ve seen a lot in the last couple of years of how embracing a Com and omni channel, retailing and Halo effect, and you know I don’t know that ten years ago in our business we were as open to change and creativity in the way that we are today, and I think our business will be better for it. I think it makes it more exciting and I think it creates a lot more opportunity. Um, and you know, on the flip side, I get it, that’s a little pollyanna, considering where we are in the greater economic climate. But, but I think it’s a really important shift in our business that over the next couple of years will be better for

Chris Ressa:
I think so set a lot there. I think I think for sure. I think the what I’d add to it is, I think that the market is actually giving us a moment in time to do that.

Whitney Livingston:
M. hm,

Chris Ressa:
In particular, If I was going to give one macro thing, I think the the challenge to build new construction today

Whitney Livingston:
M,

Chris Ressa:
is giving us the ability to re imagine and maybe not do things How they were.

Whitney Livingston:
Yeah,

Chris Ressa:
Um, so I agree, and I think we’re at a point in time where we can do that. The challenge I see, though on it is we’re slower moving than other industries

Whitney Livingston:
M,

Chris Ressa:
when it comes to re imagining.

Whitney Livingston:
Hm,

Chris Ressa:
I think we’re getting faster as an industry, but we’re slower moving and it’s and there’s road blocks and way and it’s tough to. We’re trying to satisfy a demand today that sometimes we can’t deliver

Whitney Livingston:
Yeah,

Chris Ressa:
to the market For like three or four years.

Whitney Livingston:
yeah,

Chris Ressa:
You know so

Whitney Livingston:
and then who knows if the demand is still there when we’re

Chris Ressa:
Exactly.

Whitney Livingston:
yeah,

Chris Ressa:
And then who knows if it’s still there right? It’s not like we’re coming out with a widget on a hot

Whitney Livingston:
Yeah,

Chris Ressa:
trend that’s out today.

Whitney Livingston:
yeah, it’s a great

Chris Ressa:
You

Whitney Livingston:
point.

Chris Ressa:
know, so, uh, anything else, but your scene in the market. Anything interesting that you’re seeing out there from your vantage point.

Whitney Livingston:
Um,

Chris Ressa:
Anything? what excites you?

Whitney Livingston:
Uh, what excites me is you know, Look, disruption breeds opportunity. right, so we? I mean, our industry has been in a state of disruption for the last. I don’t know what. ten years. Um, And you know, I think we’ve finally pushed off the bottom of the pool if you will, and I think there’s going to be a lot of opportunity in the next couple of years to buy at the right basis, which has, not, typically, In the case, um, for certain product types in retail real estate, and you know we all make money on the by right, so hopefully, um, uh, for those that can take advantage of that opportunity, I think there’s really great things to come, and I’m excited about that

Chris Ressa:
Excellent With that, Whitney, I’m conscious of time. I want to take us to the last part of the show. I call this retail wisdom. I’ve got three questions for you. Are you ready?

Whitney Livingston:
Ready.

Chris Ressa:
Question one, What extinct retailer do you wish would come back from the dead

Whitney Livingston:
Um, okay, I’m going to go way back. Uh,

Chris Ressa:
Way back?

Whitney Livingston:
do you remember the limited?

Chris Ressa:
Yeah,

Whitney Livingston:
Yeah, so I just, I mean, I think something great about retail is the nestalgast associated with it right like I don’t. I don’t have any feelings when I’m ordering something on Amazon. But like I remember getting my first business suits at the limited, I remember buying a You know New Year’s Eve dress there, for you know, a friend’s eighteenth birthday. Like Um, So and it was? It was a real. It was a true merchant in its heyday, and I recognized that that changed a little towards the end significantly towards the end, but I just personally have great memories of it and and I think that’s one of the real benefits of the brick and mortar experience,

Chris Ressa:
Love the answer. Totally agree. question two, What’s the last item over twenty dollars you bought in a store?

Whitney Livingston:
Um, the last item I’m not going to admit, because there’s a very good chance my husband is going to listen to this podcast, and while I was doing some some canvasing yesterday on my tour, I might have found some some cashmere sweaters that made it in my purse on the way home. so, but I love to shop in stores. I mean, I’m I understand, there’s a place for com, And I get necessities, um through e com for convenience, But when it comes to true shopping, Uh, you’ll always find me in the store.

Chris Ressa:
There’s I, actually, so I’ll take cashmere sweaters. sorry, Mer Livingston, but but

Whitney Livingston:
I did not say the brand,

Chris Ressa:
there is a place I will say this. I interviewed this guy Deenselacus in twenty twenty one, and I asked him the same question. What is one thing most people agree with, but you do not,

Whitney Livingston:
Hm,

Chris Ressa:
And he was an Commerce. He had once physical store, two physical stores, but he was the largest online party store in Australia

Whitney Livingston:
M,

Chris Ressa:
and he had. He was one of the first like, Like worldwide, Like really online, um, online retailers. He is like a really a savant with

Whitney Livingston:
M,

Chris Ressa:
Google Co, and like online marketing, And so I asked him that, and he said that commerce is going to continue Grow. He’s like, I think we’re at a saturation point with the Com and I said, Really, and he goes, You know if I don’t, he’s like. I don’t know what’s going to if it’s not five g or four G’s. like I can’t in vision in five, ten, twenty years. What the next thing is going to be? That’s going to make that grow even bigger.

Whitney Livingston:
Hm,

Chris Ressa:
And so you see all these reports that like, Oh, it’s going to go to twenty five per cent, thirty per cent, And I just today posted the clip of the interview. I gin, answering that,

Whitney Livingston:
M.

Chris Ressa:
and then looked back to. The commerce has a percentage of total retail sales, and for the last five quarters it’s been like fourteen and a half per cent.

Whitney Livingston:
Yep,

Chris Ressa:
I was like, so found it super interesting anyway. last question,

Whitney Livingston:
Okay,

Chris Ressa:
Winnie, If you and I were shopping at Target and I lost you, what I would? I find you in.

Whitney Livingston:
Okay, so on mom with me you would find me in the grocery section. I have three, three boys, seven, eight and eleven. They eat mounds

Chris Ressa:
They’re eaters.

Whitney Livingston:
of food. So that’s just like to go to. Is super Target is the grocery section. If for some reason I found myself with twenty minutes, hasn’t happened in a long time, and I walked into a target. You’d probably find me in And home furnishings,

Chris Ressa:
No,

Whitney Livingston:
Um, just browsing.

Chris Ressa:
Excellent. Well, my wife would be as well. So

Whitney Livingston:
I’ll see her there. I suspect your wife doesn’t have twenty three minutes either. Chris.

Chris Ressa:
Ah, for sure. So with that said thank you so much for doing this. Really appreciate the time.

Whitney Livingston:
Thank you. thanks for having

Chris Ressa:
and

Whitney Livingston:
me.

Chris Ressa:
let’s if we’re not on the same flight somewhere, let’s get connected in

Whitney Livingston:
Yeah,

Chris Ressa:
Vegas.

Whitney Livingston:
for sure, sounds great. Have a good one.

Chris Ressa:
You tub, thank you.

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Elmsford, NY – DLC, one of the nation’s largest owners, operators, and managers of retail real estate, has announced the successful refinancing...
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DLC is excited to announce that COO Chris Ressa has been named to the Top Retail experts list for 2024 by...
News
Elmsford, NY (December 6, 2023) – DLC, one of the country’s largest private owners, operators, and managers of open-air retail, has...